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The UHRSN Human Rights Blog seeks to amplify the voices of the young generation of human rights defenders by fostering a global dialogue.

The Plight of Economic Migrants to Europe: A Far Cry from Benefits Tourism

Refugees or Migrants?

As the EU continues to grapple the logistical aspects of the so-termed ‘European Migrant Crisis,’ a new discussion has arisen about the distinction between migrants and refugees and how each should be treated. Misunderstanding in both public opinion and political policy regarding the differences has dire consequences for the most vulnerable stakeholders — the migrants. Refugees or Migrants? Definitions vary, but according ...

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Technology and Human Trafficking

Technology and Human Trafficking

The relation between human trafficking and technology in the contemporary world is a complex and an ambiguous issue. Recent advancements in technology such as mobile phones, the internet, social media networks and others have undoubtedly made our lives and communications easier and at the same time have become an important ally in the battle against organized crime. Though no one can doubt ...

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Statement From Thai Students in Europe who are against the coup d’état in Thailand

Statement “For our friends” From Thai Students in Europe who are against the coup d’état Since the 22nd May 2014 coup d’état, student groups are undeniably one of the leaders in protesting against the coup. They are from various universities, academic disciplines, regions and backgrounds. They may have numerous different political stances, but they come together under one ideal – coups d’etat ...

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Religious Symbols and the European Convention of Human rights

Bandung, Indonesia by Haifeez CC BY 2.0

For the last few years, wearing religious symbols has triggered a major debate across Europe. The debate, which started after the imposition of prohibitions laws on religious symbols in several European states, has become a controversial human rights issue among scholars. France, Denmark, Turkey, Germany, Switzerland and other member-states of the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR) have discussed, endorsed and some ...

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What is terrorism?

After the Boston Marathon bombings in 2013, which resulted in the death of three people and injured an estimated 264 others, US President Barack Obama said, “Anytime bombs are used to target civilians, it is an act of terrorism.” What does it mean when we describe something as an act of “terrorism”, and why does it matter? Is terrorism defined by criminal ...

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Promoting human rights and peace education in Thailand

Thailand has played a vital role in promoting human rights and peace education at both the national and regional level. The country has developed, strengthened, and expanded human rights education as a result of national, regional, and global influences. [1] Among the major influences include widespread human rights violations committed throughout the country; an increasing demand for educated/trained human rights experts and ...

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Waiting for Justice: the murder of David Olyn and LGBTI rights in South Africa

I completed an internship with Sonke Gender Justice in Cape Town, South Africa, as a requirement of the Vienna University Human Rights MA program. During the internship I had the opportunity to be part of one of Sonke’s community mobilization teams, which aim to promote awareness of gender-based violence through organising training workshops, protest marches and rallies. They also follow specific cases, ...

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Making the journey to the fortress of Europe

This is the true story of my friend O. from the Gambia, who was able to reach the fortress of Europe after a year-and-a-half-long journey. I have known O. as a good and honest friend since 2011, when I went to Gambia for 7 months for an internship. I was working for a USAID-funded NGO called Hands on Care, which offered clinical ...

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Syrian Refugees: A Plea for Humaneness

‘Because humaneness, one can understand, is not welcome in this land and, therefore, [it] decided to emigrate.’ Sadly, Konstantin Wecker’s lines seem to be timeless and transcend borders. I was obligated to complete an Internship within the framework of my studies in human rights at the University of Vienna. My Internship took place at Amnesty International Austria. My adviser is in charge ...

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