Human Rights Student Publications


Author Title University Program Country Genre Year
Li, Shuyang How can “a harmonious society” be built with the contribution of a free lunch programme? University of Vienna M.A. Human Rights Vienna Austria Research Paper 2014
Abstract

student publications human rights

Chinese government has launched a programme named "Improvement of Rural Students' Nutrition Programme" in 2011[1], in order to ensure rural students' lunches in schools. To understand the reasons behind this programme, one should grab the basic information of Chinese rural poverty situation. More than 642 millions residents live in Chinese rural areas, which covers 47% of the whole population according to the data from National Bureau of Statistics of China in 2012. In the remote regions, rural poverty remains primarily a rural phenomenon[2]. People stay in a poor living condition, when it comes to young children, they are threatened by hunger. This paper will mainly focus on the rural students, because of the insufficient information, school children are picked as a specific group to be discussed. This paper tries to show a direct link between this lunch programme and unrests caused by the disparities between urban areas and rural ones. According to a report about the nutritional status of the students of Chinese rural areas released by the China Development Research Foundation in 2011, children in the poor area of the Midwest China are in a serious shortage on the nutritional intake, and that 72 percent of those children are suffering from hungry[3].

Liepina, Ieva A human rights perspective on surveillance of communications versus Data protection and privacy in Europe University of Vienna M.A. Human Rights Vienna Austria Research Paper 2014
Abstract

student publications human rights

It seems absolutely incredible, but nowadays we are facing the situation described above in the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell also in our everyday life even living in the democratic society. To illustrate this statement, for example may be referred to the report titled "Mapping Hacking Team's `Untraceable' Spyware"2 , which analyses the use of the Remote Control System (RCS). The RCS is capable of monitoring computers and telephones and may acquire data stored on such devices even if a user is offline. The system can also be used to track online correspondence. The RCS may copy files from a computer's hard drive, record Skype conversations, intercept passwords entered in a browser and remotely turn on a web camera or a computer's microphone.3 The report reads that the system is offered for sale exclusively to governments by Hacking Team, a Milan-based company. The document names twenty-one governments, including those of Italy, Columbia, Kazakhstan, Egypt, Nigeria, Hungary, Turkey, Thailand and also Poland.

Morales, Jesus Campaign S.O.S VENEZUELA University of Melbourne Masters in International Relations Australia Essay 2014
Abstract

student publications human rights

At the beginning of February 2014, a group of students from the Universidad Nacional Experimental del Táchira (Experimental University of Táchira) protested against the sexual assault of another student from the same University. This protest coincided at a time when Venezuela is also battling a severe economic crisis, shortage of basic goods, rampant corruption, poor public services and features in the top five for murder and kidnaping worldwide. The protest was repressed by the government and most students were detained. On February 5th, other university students around the country protested against the student's detention by the police. However, many of the new student protesters were also imprisoned. Two opposing politicians, Leopoldo Lopez (eventually detained on February 18th by the Maduro's government, Leopoldo is accused for determiner degree of fire, public incitement to violence, damage to public property and conspiracy), and Maria Corina Machado, tried to capitalize on the wave of discontentment by calling for Observatorio Venezolano de Violencia (Venezuelan violence observatory) Informe del OVV.

Schaick, Harry van Drugs. Sovereignty. Territory: An investigation into illicit crop reduction and state-making in (post) conflict Colombia. University of Amsterdam MSc. International Development Studies Netherlands Master Thesis 2014
Abstract

student publications human rights

Unlike many regions in the world, Latin America over the past century has suffered not from international conflict but belligerence on a more domestic level, often against several nation-states' governments (Pimentel, 2013). Colombia is no exception: 2014 marks thefiftieth anniversary of the start of the Colombian Armed Conflict (Richani, 2013b), making it the second longest civil war in history. It has resulted in 220,000 deaths and the involuntary displacement of some 5.8 million Colombians, nearly a third of the rural population (Grupo de Memoria Histórica, 2012). Peace talks between the government and the largest rebel group the FARC have been taking place in Havana since 2012, centred around six main points: land reform, political participation, drug trafficking (all already agreed), with the final three points yet to be discussed: rights of victims, disarmament of the rebels and the implementation of the peace deal. These talks are ongoing, extremely fragile and have at their core an ideological conflict that dates back more than half a century, not just between the government and the FARC but between numerous other illegal armed groups from left and right, making it an extremely complex problem that is deeply rooted in Colombia's social and political fabric . It is a combination and accumulation of the conflict, which fosters multiple armed actors that leads to a fragmentation of territorial control and therefore highly contested state margins and state sovereignty. This contestation over its territory, combined with the country's central position in fighting the global war on drugs that makes Colombia in 2014 the perfect place to research the process of `state-making' in the context of a territory that is in parts, characteristically post-conflict but in others, still very much involved in brutal armed conflict.

Skruzny, Vera What are the motives of rape in the context of the Democratic Republic of Congo, when considered to be a tool of war? University of Vienna M.A. Human Rights Vienna Austria Research Paper 2014
Abstract

student publications human rights

Again and again have newspapers been reporting about the Eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), particularly ab out the Kivu provinces which are not only known for one of the last resorts of gorillas worldwide rather known for the still ongoing brutal conflict in the area. The clashed between warring Hutu and Tutsi is considered to be the engine of this dispute. “Following the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and the establishment of a new government there, so me 1.2 million Rwandese Hutus including elements who had taken part in the genocide — fled to the neighbouring Kivu regions of eastern DRC”.(2) Since 1994 the guerrilla war of Hutu refugees against ethnic Tutsis and other ethnic groups has been ongoing, violence continued which resulted in two episodes of conflict – which are locally called “world war I” (1996) and “world war II” (1998). In both wars neighboring countries were actively involved particularly Rwanda and Uganda, to a lesser extent Namibia, Angola and Zimbabwe.

Skruzny, Vera Human Rights violations of Multi-National Corporations on the example of the Coca Cola Company which raises the question of potential universal jurisdiction of the Alien Tort Claims Act? University of Vienna M.A. Human Rights Vienna Austria Research Paper 2014
Abstract

student publications human rights

On an international level looking through the scope of international law; not only do the states play a longer pivotal role, but non-state actors such as multi-national corporations (MNCs) play a major role as well. At the same time cases of abusive economic power have been disclosed, moreover, the realization and pursuit of economic interests involves violations of human rights standards set in international law. The soft drink Coca-Cola, which promises pleasure, happiness and joy of life, is a world renowned popular brand. Even in remote villages the reliably red curved letters can be found which promise the “right attitude to life”. Furthermore it embodies the American culture similar to which citizens of the “global village” strive for.(1) The U.S. enterprise, The Coca-Cola Company produces its goods with almost 275 bottling partners around the world as well as the purchase of its products.(2) Founded in 1886 in Atlanta by Dr. John S. Pemberton, it has become the largest manufacturer of soft drinks worldwide with more than 500 different own beverage brands.(3) According to the German weekly magazine Focus, Coca-Cola sells 145 Billion liters of its drinks per year, which corresponds to an amount of 397 million liters’ per day.(4)

Teufel, Michael Occurrence of Torture in South African Police Detention Centres – Urging the South African Government to Ratify the OPCAT University of Vienna M.A. Human Rights Vienna Austria Research Paper 2014
Abstract

student publications human rights

"It is said that no one truly knows a nation until one has been inside its jails. A nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones" ­ Nelson Mandela1 Using these words as a point of reference it is difficult to negate the notion that South Africa does not treat its citizens too kindly. Allegations of torture as a common practice in South African detention centres are wide-spread and shocking cases of torture in police cells and correctional facilities continue to surface in news publications regularly. While positive developments have certainly taken place in South Africa since its transition to a democratic republic in 1994 this paper serves to argue that practice of torture continues to be rife in South Africa. In this regard statistics on the occurrence of torture in police detention centres are looked at and claims brought forward that the current oversight mechanism of the South African Police Service (SAPS), namely the Independent Police Investigative Directorate, is not equipped to adequately deal with this. Recognising the positive aspects of the establishment of national prevention mechanisms (NPM) as an obligation under the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture (OPCAT) it is proposed that the government becomes a party to it and thus increases its efforts in combating the practice of torture by enhancing its preventative approach.

Teufel, Michael Is the South African Government Providing Adequate Support to Children From Child-Headed Households? University of Vienna M.A. Human Rights Vienna Austria Research Paper 2014
Abstract

student publications human rights

This quote and the near universal ratification of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) highlight that children's rights and the protection thereof are considered to be a moral imperative of highest priority. While South Africa is no different in this regard the government is faced by the existence of a relatively new form of social entity referred to as child-headed households. Characterised by the absence of an adult caregiver these households constitute an enormous challenge for the South African government to ensure the realisation of children's rights. Given the peculiarities and complexities that arise out of this phenomenon this paper serves to help clarify the causes for the existence of child-headed households and the hardships they face. Issues surrounding the scale of the problem, government's efforts to address these and the impact this has on child-headed household will also be dealt with.

Author Title University Program Country Genre Year